Isolation of novel functional anti-cancer antibodies by phage display


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Sandrine Guillard, Steven Rust, David Lowne, Arthur Lewis, Ralph Minter, Lutz Jermutus

Medimmune, Cambridge, UK

Abstract

Phage display of antibodies is a powerful tool for the rapid isolation and evolution of therapeutic antibodies. It has also been used successfully at an earlier stage of the drug discovery process for the identification of disease-relevant epitopes and the characterisation and validation of these target antigens. We will present a technology platform that uses large, naïve scFv phage display libraries to isolate functional antibodies against novel cancer cell targets. Using phage display, antibodies are selected on primary cancer cells or cell lines and screened for functionality, e.g. anti-proliferative effects or internalisation via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and cancer cell specificity prior to target antigen identification. Assigning antibody function at the earliest opportunity biases the process towards the identification of novel target antigens with potential therapeutic application.

Phage display of antibodies is a powerful tool for the rapid isolation and evolution of therapeutic antibodies. It has also been used successfully at an earlier stage of the drug discovery process for the identification of disease-relevant epitopes and the characterisation and validation of these target antigens. We will present a technology platform that uses large, naïve scFv phage display libraries to isolate functional antibodies against novel cancer cell targets. Using phage display, antibodies are selected on primary cancer cells or cell lines and screened for functionality, e.g. anti-proliferative effects or internalisation via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and cancer cell specificity prior to target antigen identification. Assigning antibody function at the earliest opportunity biases the process towards the identification of novel target antigens with potential therapeutic application.

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