BARRETT’S OESOPHAGUS PATIENTS ATTENDING HOSPITAL: BASELINE CLINICAL, PATIENT HISTORY AND QUALITY OF LIFE DATA FROM BOSS AND ASPECT


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Sharon Love1,Gavin Reilly1,Corran Roberts1,Adelyn Wise2,Paul Moayyedi3,Chris Foy4,Clive Stokes4,John De Caestecker5,Stephen Attwood6,Peter Watson7,Yeng Ang8,Pradeep Bhandiri9,Oliver Old4,Julie Hapeshi4,Ian Penman10,Colin Rodgers11,Cathryn Edwards12,David Monk13,Krish Ragunath14,Danielle Morris15,David Johnston16,Hugh Barr4,Janusz Jankowski17
1Centre for Statistics in Medicine (CSM), University of Oxford,2Oncology Clinical Trials Office, University of Oxford,3Department of Medicine, McMaster University Ontario, Canada,4Gloucester Royal Hospital, Gloucester, United Kingdom,5University Hospital Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom,6School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom,7Queens University Belfast,8Wrightington, Wigan & Leigh NHS, Wigan,9Spire Portsmouth Hospital, Portsmouth,,10Western General Hospital and Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom,11Northern Trust, Antrim, United Kingdom,12South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Devon, United Kingdom,13Chester Hospital, Chester, United Kingdom,14Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, United Kingdom,15Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City, United Kingdom,16Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom,17University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Abstract

Background

From 2005 to 2011 two large UK studies recruited 6,327 evaluable patients with Barrett’s Oesophagusattending hospital clinics. Baseline clinical, patient history and quality of life data was collected prior to randomisation andthis rich dataset is the basis for this abstract.

Method

Patients were recruited to AspECT and BOSS at local centres through normal endoscopy clinics andsurveillance lists including those newly diagnosed or with an existing diagnosis of Barrett’s oesophagus.Baseline information was collected on age, gender, ethnicity, length of Barrett’s, presence of hiatus hernia, intestinalmetaplasia and low grade dysplasia, concomitant medications, comorbidities, duration and severity of symptoms andpatients’ self-reported Quality of Life data.

Results

The sample was mainly male (75%, n=6,327) with median age of 64 years (range 18-92 years, n=6,327).Median Barrett’s length was 4cm (range 1-24 cm, n=6,029) and median time since diagnosis of Barrett’s was 2 years(range 0-41 years, n=5,805). At least one symptom of reflux was experienced by 60% of patients and 46% of patientsexperienced at least one symptom at least once per week (n=1,072). Length of Barrett’s was associated with age(n=6,029), gender (n=6,029), presence of low grade dysplasia (n=5,955), presence of intestinal metaplasia (n=6,026) andtime since diagnosis (n=5,913).

Conclusion

This is our first release of data from AspECT and BOSS with more to follow. It is a large set of data onBarrett’s patients which we expect to be typical of Barrett’s patients attending hospital clinics in the UK. The averageperson was a male age 62 with 4 cm Barrett’s having had a Barrett’s diagnosis for 2 years.