Continuous physiologic monitoring using wearable sensors of home based cancer patients with COVID-19: RECAP study (NCT04397705)


Year:

Session type:

Ann Tivey1, Rohan Shotton1, Rachel Oakley2, Sally Taylor1, Tim Cooksley1, Andre Freitas2, David Wong2, Michael King1, John Radford2
1The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, 2University of Manchester

Abstract

Background

Patients with cancer are at high risk of developing serious infections including Covid-19. Those with less severe Covid-19 have been managed at home but monitoring for potential deterioration presents a challenge. In the RECAP study we assessed the feasibility of using wearable sensors in ambulatory patients with cancer and Covid-19 to record and transmit physiological data in real-time to the treating hospital.

Method

Patients with Covid-19 and cancer considered suitable for outpatient care wore Isansys™ sensors which continuously monitored their heart rate, respiratory rate and temperature for up to three weeks. Pulse-oximetry measurements were recorded twice daily. Physiologic data was transmitted in real-time to the hospital network via a secure connection. Data other than oxygen saturations were analysed retrospectively. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were completed by patients and thematic qualitative analysis performed.

Results

Results: 8 patients (6 female, 2 male) with median age of 62 years were recruited. Demographics, cancer diagnosis, and study outcomes are summarised below:

Gender

Cancer type

Age

Study days

Comments

Male

Lung

68

8

Hospital Admission D8:  triggered by low oxygen saturations

Female

Ovarian

57

2

Patient and CI decision: Unable to work technology/increasingly anxious.

Female

Colorectal

47

8

Patient decision: overwhelmed with diagnosis and Covid-19

Male

Lung

68

21

Completed 21 days

Female

Lung

73

5

Hospital Admission D5: triggered by low oxygen saturations

Female

Breast

40

15

Patient decision: tolerability, G2 skin reaction

Female

Ovarian

67

21

Completed 21 days

Female

Breast

47

 

14

 

Patient decision: ‘too much’, experiencing chemotherapy side effects

Conclusion

To our knowledge, RECAP is the first study demonstrating physiologic monitoring of outpatients with Covid-19 with real-time data transmission to hospital. Patients were generally positive about monitoring in this way but highlighted usability issues relating to device complexity which need addressing in subsequent studies. In future this technology could potentially be used to monitor patients at high risk of sepsis; facilitating earlier intervention and improved outcomes.

Impact statement

Wearable sensors can be used to monitor outpatients and transmit physiologic data in real-time to clinicians; this technology could be used in cancer patients at risk of deterioration to facilitate earlier treatment before the onset of critical illness.