Histological Expression and function of complement molecules in ovarian cancer


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Abdulhafid Wafa1, Ian Scott3, Ian Spendlove2, Heidi Sowter1

1University of Derby, Derby, Derbyshire, UK, 2University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK, 3Derby City General Hospital, Derby, Derbyshire, UK

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the commonest gynaecological malignancy in Britain and continues to have the highest mortality. Dysregulated expression of the complement factors CD55 and CD59 has been associated with poor outcome and carcinogenesis in a variety of carcinomas.

The objective of this study was to investigate the possible biological mechanisms underplaying ovarian cancer patients’ response to tamoxifen, warfarin and cyclophosohamide, and to establish whether the expression of CD55 and or CD59 is related to other markers of prognosis. The project was based on anonymous samples of ovarian tissue taken at primary diagnosis from 350 patients. The study was a one phase II trial in relapsed ovarian cancer patients that used tamoxifen, warfarin and cyclophosohamide, was undertaken in Derby. This trial demonstrated a significant improvement (12.5% complete remission, 5.7% partial remission and 17% stable disease) in patients with recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer who had previously had platinum - based treatment.

We used immunohistochemistry to localise the expression of tumour associated macrophages, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, CD55, CD59 and caspase 3. Expression levels were graded using the multiplicative quick score system.

We then statistically analysed the level of expression of CD55 and CD59 for relationships between each other, stage, grade, type of primary tumour and patient outcome. SPSS used to analyse univariate associations between CD55 and CD59 expression and the expression of modulators (T test and Mann Whitney); cilnicopathological parameters (Chi2); survival associations (Log Rank) and for multivariate Cox’s analysis.

The resulting data will be presented.

Ovarian cancer is the commonest gynaecological malignancy in Britain and continues to have the highest mortality. Dysregulated expression of the complement factors CD55 and CD59 has been associated with poor outcome and carcinogenesis in a variety of carcinomas.

The objective of this study was to investigate the possible biological mechanisms underplaying ovarian cancer patients’ response to tamoxifen, warfarin and cyclophosohamide, and to establish whether the expression of CD55 and or CD59 is related to other markers of prognosis. The project was based on anonymous samples of ovarian tissue taken at primary diagnosis from 350 patients. The study was a one phase II trial in relapsed ovarian cancer patients that used tamoxifen, warfarin and cyclophosohamide, was undertaken in Derby. This trial demonstrated a significant improvement (12.5% complete remission, 5.7% partial remission and 17% stable disease) in patients with recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer who had previously had platinum - based treatment.

We used immunohistochemistry to localise the expression of tumour associated macrophages, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, CD55, CD59 and caspase 3. Expression levels were graded using the multiplicative quick score system.

We then statistically analysed the level of expression of CD55 and CD59 for relationships between each other, stage, grade, type of primary tumour and patient outcome. SPSS used to analyse univariate associations between CD55 and CD59 expression and the expression of modulators (T test and Mann Whitney); cilnicopathological parameters (Chi2); survival associations (Log Rank) and for multivariate Cox’s analysis.

The resulting data will be presented.